Hotel or Restaurant dinnerware marks

Question:

Dear Experts

    I recently bought an off-white bowl with a Red Wing mark on the bottom.  It’s about 4 1/2 inches across and 1 3/4 inches high, and has ridges on the outside.  I have a number of Red Wing pieces, and have seen a lot more, but I don’t remember this mark.  Could you tell me about it, please?

    Patricia

Answer:

This upright wing ink stamp mark can be found on two kinds of Red Wing dinnerware. It was first used to mark Hotel or Restaurant dinnerware, a line of heavy durable dishes made for the restaurant trade in the 1960s. This bowl is from the Empire pattern, one of two designs in the Hotel or Restaurant line. (The other pattern is named Regal.) This ink stamp was also used to mark a variety of dinnerware items that were finished after Red Wing Potteries closed in 1967.  Workers glazed the green ware that remained after the plant closed with whatever glazes were still on hand, primarily the popular beige fleck glaze. Dinnerware items with this upright wing mark in non-standard colors were made by Red Wing and are categorized as post-production items.   

Larry

Beigh Fleck Chop plate, Bob White trivet and tumbler

Question:

My mother recently gave me her set of Red Wing Bob White. I’ve been able to research most of the items myself, but have questions on a few pieces. I have attached pictures.

 

First is what she called a fish tray. It does not have the Bob White decoration but does have the coloration of the pattern and says Red Wing on the bottom. Is it Bob White and what would be a value?

 

Next is a tumbler. She had two of these…one for each of us boys. It’s obviously a second….the picture will show the flaw. Otherwise they’re in excellent condition. Value with the flaw please.

 

And finally a Bob White trivet in excellent condition. Value please.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Steve

Answer:

The platter (fish tray) is not Bob White. It is one of numerous Red Wing items produced with the popular Beige Fleck glaze and no other decoration. These items were intended to be used with any pattern, especially those with the Beige Fleck background color (such as Bob White). Value for the platter is $20-25 in mint condition.

The Bob White trivet is difficult to find and was made for only two years (1958-1959). Value is $150 to $200 in mint condition.

Bob White tumblers are also difficult to find and were made for a limited time beginning in the early 1960s. Value in mint condition is $60-75. The flaw shown on the tumbler will reduce the value by approximately 50%.

Larry

Pitcher, Fruit dinnerware pattern

Question:

Hello,

I received this pitcher from a friend and was wondering more about it and its value. Also anyone that would like to purchase it.

Description:

 Light rose background Slight chip (?) on bottom but it looks like it has been glazed over. Can’t see the dull clay On the bottom is Red Wing, Hand painted, USA, 2103 No other chips or marks.

Any help would be appreciated

Judy

Answer:

The photo shows a water pitcher from the Fruit dinnerware pattern. Fruit is one of many patterns made in the Concord shape. The pattern was designed by Belle Kogan and was produced from 1952 to 1955. The number 2103 is a stock or lot number; it does not identify the pattern and has no affect on value. Value for a Fruit pitcher in mint condition is $40-50. Damage will reduce the value by 25 to 75% or more depending on the extent and location of the damage.

Larry

Textured Cake Stand

Question:

I recently acquired this item at a local gift shop. The plate is glued to a candlestick (to form a cake plate) and so there aren’t any markings visible on the backside. The plate is 10-3/8” in diameter and the ceramic finish appears to have a sort of basket weave look. I’m not versed in the language of dinnerware and so am not able to give you the best description. I hope the photo is sufficient. I had contacted Replacements.com and they identified the plate as follows:

Pattern: REW13 by Red Wing [REWREW13]
Description: Anniversary, Brown Flower, Smooth, No Trim

However, I saw no such item on the redwingdinnerware.com website. I’m wondering if it is a Red Wing knockoff.

This search has been an education since I was totally unfamiliar with Red Wing Pottery before now.

I love the pattern and would like to pursue a collection but can’t begin without accurate identification. Thank you for any help you can offer.

Sherry

Answer:

Sorry, but I’m quite certain that neither section of this pedestal stand was made by Red Wing.  Other potteries made plates with a textured surface similar to Tweed Tex. In fact I purchased a pedestal stand very similar to this one on eBay years ago in hopes it was a Red Wing oddity, but it was not.  The giveaway is the foot ring on the bottom of the plate.  The ring on this plate is wider and closer to the edge of the plate; the ring on a Tweed Tex dinner plate is smaller and not as wide.  I’ve attached a photo of a Tweed Tex plate for comparison. 

Tweed Tex was produced from 1953 to 1956. As for how Red Wing dinnerware was decorated, it was done in production line fashion.  Each painter was assigned a color or two, and as the dinnerware came down the line the painter added the strokes needed in her colors.  Other than items made for personal use (lunch hour pieces), no one employee decorated an entire dinnerware set or even a single item.

Larry

Capistrano Lead Content

Question:

Hi, I just got some Red Wing dinnerware (not sure what pattern, stamped Red Wing 120) from my mother. How do I know if it’s safe to eat off of? Do these have incredibly high lead content? Love the look of it. Just not sure it’s safe.

It’s Capistrano. I have dinner plates but also some smaller pieces and serving pieces. I was trying to figure out what pattern the cup and salt and pepper shaker were when I saw a photo of a set of Capistrano that had the same sage-green salt and pepper shaker. So maybe it’s also part of the line? The cup is the one with the weird grey residue that’s making me nervous about all the rest.

Thanks!

Marla

Answer:

I am not an expert on the chemical composition of Red Wing dinnerware but it’s my understanding most Red Wing glazes contained lead.  Intact pieces with no chips, cracks or stains should be safe to use.  Damage, including tiny surface cracks or crazing, indicates the glaze is not intact and chemicals could potentially leak out.  Avoid using damaged pieces to serve food.

Larry

Red Wing “Party Ware”

Question:

Hello,

I’ve come across a Red Wing “Party Ware” 13″ salad bowl, marked “100” on bottom, with grey back glaze. Its condition is excellent with no chips, cracks or crazing. I’m trying to get some idea of the scarcity/value of a piece like this. Can you give any suggestions?

Thank you for your help!
Dan

Answer:

A 1949 Party Ware brochure refers to item 100 as the Master Salad Bowl (as opposed to individual salad  bowls).  This large bowl is quite scarce, especially compared to the more common individual salad bowls and plates.  Value for a Master Salad Bowl in mint condition would be $75-100. 

Larry

Iris Dinnerware

Question:

Can you tell me the value of my Iris collection. I feel the coffee cups are very hard to find verses the tea cups. What more can you tell me about it.

Answer:

Thank you for the nice photo of your Iris Dinnerware.

Coffee cup: $25-35
Tea cup: $10-12
Teapot w/cover: $60-75
Gravy boat: $25-30
Pitcher: $40-50
Casserole w/cover: $25-35
Platter: $25-35
Butter dish w/cover: $30-40 

All values assume mint condition. Larry

Village Green creamer and sugar

Question:

I recently bought this light brown cream and sugar that looks identical to the dark brown set of village brown/green that I already owned.  These pieces have the same weight, and size of the pieces I already had, and the color of the interior glazes seem identical, but I cannot find any information about a light brown color being used on the outside of these patterns.  Do you have any insight to offer, or are these pieces possibly hobby pieces?

Thanks for your help

Ronald

Answer:

The creamer and sugar bowl with the tan exteriors were made by Red Wing in the Village Green shape. They are from a limited production run that substituted light brown or tan color in place of the dark brown found on Village Green items. No company documentation has been found and the official name of this design (if any) is unknown. Collectors refer to it as Wheat or Sand. An interview with a former Red Wing Potteries employee published in the RWCS Newsletter stated that only a few sets of “Village Wheat” were made. The concept was dropped due to lack of interest was never put into full production. Known items made with Wheat colors include 4 and 10 cup pitchers, teapot, salt & pepper shakers, creamer & sugar bowl, 6” salad bowl, large salad bowl, beverage mug, beverage server (coffee pot), handled marmite, casseroles, divided vegetable dish and large warmer stand. The interview also mentioned that 4 or 5 Wheat water coolers were made but to my knowledge none have been found.

I would estimate the value of this Wheat creamer and covered sugar bowl to be $50 to $75 each if they are in mint condition.

Larry

5 section nut/relish dish and 12 inch salad bowl

Question:

What are thiese pieces worth? I am not sure the cup is Red Wing.

Answer:

The cup was not made by Red Wing. The 5 section nut or relish dish and the 12” salad bowl in beige fleck glaze sold well back in the day and are very easy to find today. They are not part of a specific dinnerware pattern but were sold as gift items that blend well with a wide variety of patterns. Each is worth $15-20 in excellent condition. Larry

Gypsy Trail line and Oomph salt and peppers

Question:

I was told that all these pieces are Red Wing, the cream and sugar are marked and I believe they are the snack set from the Gypsy Trail line, but the salt + pepper are not marked at all and I have doubts they are RW.  Can you verify for me please.  Thanks

Richard

Answer:

The blue creamer and sugar are from the Gypsy Trail line. A Gypsy Trail brochure from the late 1930s includes this set with the Plain pattern. They are often called the “snack” creamer and sugar, probably due to their small size and to differentiate them from another creamer and sugar set in the Plain pattern. This set is quite common and is readily available today. Value for a blue set in mint condition would be $25-30.

The mushroom-shaped salt & pepper shakers are indeed Red Wing. They are from the Bakeware pattern, or Oomph as it is more commonly known. Bakeware was produced during the World War II years. If you look carefully you may find these shakers bottom marked with “RW”. Some are marked, others are not. Value for these shakers would be $20-25 if they are in excellent condition.

Larry

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