Incised Peasant Salad Bowl, white

Question:

hello- i collect red wing and have since 1992 when i bought my first vase. however, back in the 90s i found a piece at an estate sale which i have never seen another even remotely like it. it’s a shallow bowl on a footed base, in the stonware material with relief pictures of people dancing and flowers. it says simply “Red Wing usa” on the bottom. help!! i would love to know value and time period, design style, etc!! thanks! stephanie

Answer:

According to a July 1942 sales brochure, you have an “Incised Peasant” Salad Bowl. It is one of three items available in the Incised Peasant design. The other two are a Cookie Jar and a Munch Jar (low and squat in shape). The bowl is the only piece marked Red Wing. All three items were available in three colors: Brown, Green and White. These items were produced during the World War II years.

Unlike most Red Wing hand painted pottery, the peasant figures were cold painted (over the glaze). Because the colors are not sealed under the glaze they are easily removed. After 60-some years many of these pieces have lost a considerable amount of their original paint . That appears to be the case with your bowl as only a bit of paint on the faces of the dancers remains. An “all white” bowl is merely a cold painted bowl that has lost its paint over time.

An Incised Peasant Salad Bowl in excellent condition and with intact original paint would be worth $25 to $40, with the white color on the low end and green on the high end. Loss of paint detracts from the value, as do any chips and cracks.

Brittney Teapots glazing problem

Question:

I have a red-wing pottery teapot that needs reglazing.   The glaze on the outside becomes flaky.  Is this possible?  Also I am interested in its worth.  The lid has a yellow rose bud with 2 green leaves in the middle.  Circled by a yellow ring with a blue ring at the edge.  the pot has yellow roses with blue violets and blue aster (?) flowers painted on each side with green leaves.  It is a cute teapot.

Can you get the bleach out of the clay?  What temperature is the Red Wing pottery fired at orginally.  I probably will not keep the teapot if it is not functional but don’t want to throw it away.  Any suggestions?  Carolyn

Answer:

The name of this teapot’s pattern is Brittany. I am not aware of anybody that performs reglazing on dinnerware and am not sure if it is possible given your description of the problem.  If the glaze is flaking, I’d be concerned that a prior owner may have soaked the teapot in bleach to remove stains in the clay.  If this occurred and the bleach was not properly soaked out at the end, the clay can turn to a powdery dust.  If white powder forms on the surface, most likely it is due to bleach.  Value for a Brittany teapot in excellent condition is $50-75. 

Sorry, I do not know the kiln temperature used to fire Brittany dinnerware. If bleach is the problem, the characteristic odor of bleach will likely be noticed if you sniff the teapot’s surface. Soaking the teapot in clean water will help to remove any remaining bleach but won’t reverse any damage that has already been done. Continue the soak for several days and change the water daily. When done soaking, set the teapot on a towel and allow it to air dry for several days.

Larry

Brittany teapot with glaze issues

Question:

I have a red-wing pottery teapot that needs reglazing.   The glaze on the outside becomes flaky.  Is this possible?  Also I am interested in its worth.  The lid has a yellow rose bud with 2 green leaves in the middle.  Circled by a yellow ring with a blue ring at the edge.  the pot has yellow roses with blue violets and blue aster (?) flowers painted on each side with green leaves.  It is a cute teapot. 

Answer:

The name of this teapot’s pattern is Brittany. I am not aware of anybody that performs reglazing on dinnerware and am not sure if it is possible given your description of the problem.  If the glaze is flaking, I’d be concerned that a prior owner may have soaked the teapot in bleach to remove stains in the clay.  If this occurred and the bleach was not properly soaked out at the end, the clay can turn to a powdery dust.  If white powder forms on the surface, most likely it is due to bleach.  Value for a Brittany teapot in excellent condition is $50-75. 

Larry

Hotel or Restaurant dinnerware marks

Question:

Dear Experts

    I recently bought an off-white bowl with a Red Wing mark on the bottom.  It’s about 4 1/2 inches across and 1 3/4 inches high, and has ridges on the outside.  I have a number of Red Wing pieces, and have seen a lot more, but I don’t remember this mark.  Could you tell me about it, please?

    Patricia

Answer:

This upright wing ink stamp mark can be found on two kinds of Red Wing dinnerware. It was first used to mark Hotel or Restaurant dinnerware, a line of heavy durable dishes made for the restaurant trade in the 1960s. This bowl is from the Empire pattern, one of two designs in the Hotel or Restaurant line. (The other pattern is named Regal.) This ink stamp was also used to mark a variety of dinnerware items that were finished after Red Wing Potteries closed in 1967.  Workers glazed the green ware that remained after the plant closed with whatever glazes were still on hand, primarily the popular beige fleck glaze. Dinnerware items with this upright wing mark in non-standard colors were made by Red Wing and are categorized as post-production items.   

Larry

Beigh Fleck Chop plate, Bob White trivet and tumbler

Question:

My mother recently gave me her set of Red Wing Bob White. I’ve been able to research most of the items myself, but have questions on a few pieces. I have attached pictures.

 

First is what she called a fish tray. It does not have the Bob White decoration but does have the coloration of the pattern and says Red Wing on the bottom. Is it Bob White and what would be a value?

 

Next is a tumbler. She had two of these…one for each of us boys. It’s obviously a second….the picture will show the flaw. Otherwise they’re in excellent condition. Value with the flaw please.

 

And finally a Bob White trivet in excellent condition. Value please.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Steve

Answer:

The platter (fish tray) is not Bob White. It is one of numerous Red Wing items produced with the popular Beige Fleck glaze and no other decoration. These items were intended to be used with any pattern, especially those with the Beige Fleck background color (such as Bob White). Value for the platter is $20-25 in mint condition.

The Bob White trivet is difficult to find and was made for only two years (1958-1959). Value is $150 to $200 in mint condition.

Bob White tumblers are also difficult to find and were made for a limited time beginning in the early 1960s. Value in mint condition is $60-75. The flaw shown on the tumbler will reduce the value by approximately 50%.

Larry

Pitcher, Fruit dinnerware pattern

Question:

Hello,

I received this pitcher from a friend and was wondering more about it and its value. Also anyone that would like to purchase it.

Description:

 Light rose background Slight chip (?) on bottom but it looks like it has been glazed over. Can’t see the dull clay On the bottom is Red Wing, Hand painted, USA, 2103 No other chips or marks.

Any help would be appreciated

Judy

Answer:

The photo shows a water pitcher from the Fruit dinnerware pattern. Fruit is one of many patterns made in the Concord shape. The pattern was designed by Belle Kogan and was produced from 1952 to 1955. The number 2103 is a stock or lot number; it does not identify the pattern and has no affect on value. Value for a Fruit pitcher in mint condition is $40-50. Damage will reduce the value by 25 to 75% or more depending on the extent and location of the damage.

Larry

Textured Cake Stand

Question:

I recently acquired this item at a local gift shop. The plate is glued to a candlestick (to form a cake plate) and so there aren’t any markings visible on the backside. The plate is 10-3/8” in diameter and the ceramic finish appears to have a sort of basket weave look. I’m not versed in the language of dinnerware and so am not able to give you the best description. I hope the photo is sufficient. I had contacted Replacements.com and they identified the plate as follows:

Pattern: REW13 by Red Wing [REWREW13]
Description: Anniversary, Brown Flower, Smooth, No Trim

However, I saw no such item on the redwingdinnerware.com website. I’m wondering if it is a Red Wing knockoff.

This search has been an education since I was totally unfamiliar with Red Wing Pottery before now.

I love the pattern and would like to pursue a collection but can’t begin without accurate identification. Thank you for any help you can offer.

Sherry

Answer:

Sorry, but I’m quite certain that neither section of this pedestal stand was made by Red Wing.  Other potteries made plates with a textured surface similar to Tweed Tex. In fact I purchased a pedestal stand very similar to this one on eBay years ago in hopes it was a Red Wing oddity, but it was not.  The giveaway is the foot ring on the bottom of the plate.  The ring on this plate is wider and closer to the edge of the plate; the ring on a Tweed Tex dinner plate is smaller and not as wide.  I’ve attached a photo of a Tweed Tex plate for comparison. 

Tweed Tex was produced from 1953 to 1956. As for how Red Wing dinnerware was decorated, it was done in production line fashion.  Each painter was assigned a color or two, and as the dinnerware came down the line the painter added the strokes needed in her colors.  Other than items made for personal use (lunch hour pieces), no one employee decorated an entire dinnerware set or even a single item.

Larry

Capistrano Lead Content

Question:

Hi, I just got some Red Wing dinnerware (not sure what pattern, stamped Red Wing 120) from my mother. How do I know if it’s safe to eat off of? Do these have incredibly high lead content? Love the look of it. Just not sure it’s safe.

It’s Capistrano. I have dinner plates but also some smaller pieces and serving pieces. I was trying to figure out what pattern the cup and salt and pepper shaker were when I saw a photo of a set of Capistrano that had the same sage-green salt and pepper shaker. So maybe it’s also part of the line? The cup is the one with the weird grey residue that’s making me nervous about all the rest.

Thanks!

Marla

Answer:

I am not an expert on the chemical composition of Red Wing dinnerware but it’s my understanding most Red Wing glazes contained lead.  Intact pieces with no chips, cracks or stains should be safe to use.  Damage, including tiny surface cracks or crazing, indicates the glaze is not intact and chemicals could potentially leak out.  Avoid using damaged pieces to serve food.

Larry

Red Wing “Party Ware”

Question:

Hello,

I’ve come across a Red Wing “Party Ware” 13″ salad bowl, marked “100″ on bottom, with grey back glaze. Its condition is excellent with no chips, cracks or crazing. I’m trying to get some idea of the scarcity/value of a piece like this. Can you give any suggestions?

Thank you for your help!
Dan

Answer:

A 1949 Party Ware brochure refers to item 100 as the Master Salad Bowl (as opposed to individual salad  bowls).  This large bowl is quite scarce, especially compared to the more common individual salad bowls and plates.  Value for a Master Salad Bowl in mint condition would be $75-100. 

Larry

Iris Dinnerware

Question:

Can you tell me the value of my Iris collection. I feel the coffee cups are very hard to find verses the tea cups. What more can you tell me about it.

Answer:

Thank you for the nice photo of your Iris Dinnerware.

Coffee cup: $25-35
Tea cup: $10-12
Teapot w/cover: $60-75
Gravy boat: $25-30
Pitcher: $40-50
Casserole w/cover: $25-35
Platter: $25-35
Butter dish w/cover: $30-40 

All values assume mint condition. Larry

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